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ADDUCTOR RELEASE FOR ATHLETIC GROIN PAIN

THE INJURY
 
The adductor muscles of the thigh connect the lower rim of the pelvic
bone (pubis) to the thigh-bone (femur). These muscles exert high forces
during activities such as soccer, hockey and football when powerful and
explosive movements take place.  High stresses are concentrated especially
at the tendon of the adductor longus tendon where it attaches to the bone.
This tendon can become irritated and inflamed and be the source of
unrelenting pain in the groin area. Pain can also be felt in the lower abdomen.
 
THE OPERATION
 
Athletic groin pain due to chronic injury to the adductor longus muscle-tendon
complex usually can be relieved by releasing the tendon where it attaches to the
pubic bone.  A small incision is made over the tendon attachment and the tendon
is cut, or released from its attachment to the bone.  The tendon retracts distally and
heals to the surrounding tissues. The groin pain is usually relieved since the injured
tendon is no longer anchored to the bone.
 
It takes several weeks for the area to heal.  Athletes can often  return to full
competition after a period of 8-12 weeks of rehabilitation, but it may take
a longer period of time to regain full strength and function.
 
RISKS OF SURGERY AND RESULTS
 
As with any operation, there are potential risks and possible complications.  These are rare, and precautions are taken to avoid problems.  The spermatic cord (in males) is close to the operative area, but it is rarely at risk.  There is a small chance for bleeding in the area.  There is a small (less than 1%) risk of infection after surgery. The success rate of adductor release surgery is high if the pain is coming from the adductor longus tendon.  Pain can also come from an associated lower abdominal strain, which may require additional (or concomitant) surgery.  If the adductor is painful on only one side, occasionally the other side can also be strained and become painful.
 
 
                               
ADDUCTOR TENDON RELEASE
PREOPERATIVE INSTRUCTIONS
 
 
Within one month of surgery
• Preoperative office visit for history and physical examination and instructions
• Complete blood count (CBC) if indicated
• Electrocardiogrm (EKG) if indicated
 
Within several days of surgery
• Wash the upper thigh and groin area well with soap or Hibiclens
• Be careful of the skin to avoid sunburn, poison ivy, rashes, etc.
 
The day before surgery
• Check with the doctor’s office for your time to report to the surgical unit the next day.
• HAVE NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK AFTER MIDNIGHT.  If surgery will be done in the afternoon, you can have clear liquids only up to six hours before surgery but no milk or food.
 
The day of surgery
• Nothing to eat or drink
• You probably will be able to go home shortly after surgery.
• Bring crutches if they were provided prior to surgery.
• You will wake up in the operating room and be taken to the recovery room.  A sterile dressing will be in place and your legs will be stretched out to the sides.  You should keep the legs stretched out to the sides (abducted) continuously for the first two or three days after surgery (starting in the recovery room). An ice pack will be applied to the groin area to reduce pain and swelling.
• When you have fully recovered from anesthesia (usually in 1-2 hours), you can go home.
 

 

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